Audio Interviews With Big Names – How to Land One

If I was just starting my information product business and had no profile, this is what I’d do in order to get started.

I’d quickly try to establish myself as an expert. But I’d leverage off the expertise of others.

Now the top guys in your industry or field may not know you. But they do know each other.

So, I’d try to position myself as a kind of public relations expert.

I’d go to each expert in the field I’m interested in and say: “I’ve got this idea. I’m putting together a book with a compilation of audio interviews on the world’s greatest copywriters”.

And if my field was something else, say music or health, I’d do exactly the same thing. I’d try to talk to them on the phone and really project a passion for what I was proposing. 

But if I couldn’t get them on the phone I’d try to project it in an email. I’d say: “I’m planning on interviewing Bob Bly, Clayton Makepeace, Joe Vitale, John Carlton and Ted Nicholas. I’d also like to interview you”.

I’d explain that I’m going to turn the interviews into transcripts which in turn will become a book that I plan on getting up on Amazon. I’d tell them about a Web site dedicated to the book.

That I’d be doing joint ventures…And that “I’m going to promote this like you wouldn’t believe”.

They’d be crazy not to come onboard.

Why?  Because by grouping them with other experts in their field, I’m reinforcing the perception that they too are an expert.

Plus, I’m doing all the promotion and distribution that they can leverage of.

Think about all the experts who contributed to the smash hit documentary, the Secret; people like Bob Proctor and Jack Canfield.

How better known are they because of their participation in that film.

It’s a no-brainer when you think about it. Try it some time.

Get Prospects to Actually Listen to Your Audio Interviews

How do you get prospects to actually listen to your interviews?  You are always going to have some people who toss your information. Probably a majority of the people and it depends on how you distribute the audio. If you give them the choice and you’ve described the audio of what they are going to listen to and you’ve done a good job on the production there is a good chance they won’t toss it if they are in the market for what you have created for them in that interview.

They’ll toss it if you give them a poor interview, if you’re asking questions that they don’t want to know. If you’re not covering the information through your research that they need to know. All the mistakes we’ve talked about will get them to toss your recording. But if you’ve done it right and matched your message and your expert to your market there is no reason they should toss it. If you are taking your interview and mailing it to every name in the phone book, yeah, they are going to toss it because its junk mail.

If you give people the choice to download and absorb the information on their time, by their own choice and they’ve qualified themselves by the description, the headline, of what this interview is about and what you promised to deliver, they will listen to your interview and they will listen to all of it and whatever you can provide them. I have people who tell me they’ve listened to every interview on my site. They have listened to 100 hours of my interviews. So if your content provides value they will listen to it.

Use Audio Interviews to Attract Customers – A How-To

If you’ve conducted an audio interview with an expert, you’re well on your way to having a business that can make you money.

Some people get stuck on the idea that an interview is just that – an interview.  Don’t do that.  What I want to encourage you to do is to see the interview as information product.

Obviously, that information product has a value for the information it provides.  But, it also has a perceived value for the way that information is delivered.

For example, an ability to listen to an interview online has an inherent value.  But it is not as valuable as an ability to download the interview and take it with you on the road, in the garden, or when you’re out “pounding the pavement” getting fit.

The reason the second option is more valuable?  Choice.  People like choice and are prepared to pay more for it.

Taking this process further, another way to enhance the value would be to provide a transcript of the interview.  That way, people who like to read could also tap into your stuff. 

If you follow this model through you have the basics for an opt-in program on your website.  For example, in order to capture the email address of a potential customer you could make available a sample of the interview. Having wet their appetite, you could then offer that customer the ability to download the interview so that they can take it on the road. They could pay a monthly fee for this service.  In order to further increase the value and charge a premium on the monthly fee, you could offer to supply the transcript.

And then. Hey presto.  Using one audio product, you have created a viable business system that’s a win for you and a win for the customer.

How to Fall in Love With Audio Interviews

I want you to fall in love. In love with recording audio interviews. And I’m going to tell you if you want to make money doing something you love, you should do audio interviews. With Audio Interviews you can package them and sell them.

I’m going to give you a perfect example about how to do this. There’s a website called Tunecore and these guys are doing exactly what I’m teaching. I have no idea who they are, but they have all kinds of information products, audio downloads, they interview experts and the gentleman who asked this, he loves musicians, I would say start interviewing musicians. Let’s say he interviews ten musicians about their career as a musician. What do you think someone will pay more for?

Those two interviews with those musicians and what they love about their career and what their life is like and how many gigs they play? Or what if you did ten interviews for musicians on how to get a number one song or how to do mastering; how to master your songs. Or how to do marketing or how to publish your digital music. An interview on vinyl, creating vinyl records and selling old LPs. Or mixing your music for the best potential sales on copyright issues.

These are subjects that the business of the music industry, I think, would have a lot more appeal and bring a higher dollar volume than actually the lifestyles of different musicians.

So I would tell him start interviewing experts within the business music industry. It’s a huge niche. These guys, I remember looking at what of their seminars because these guys – their niche – is teaching about publishing your digital songs so musicians who create a series of songs it’s not really all about albums anymore, it’s about that one track, that one hit, and it’s about how to market your song.

It was interesting to me because I wanted to learn from music about how to get distribution on an audio interview. It’s not music but it’s still an audio content and their distribution system would work the same way for me and I’ve looked at their seminar. They were selling an online training for about $10,000. So I would tell this guy, go to Tunecore, look at what they’re doing and model it. Their niche is digital music. Maybe you can model something for maybe vinyl music, LPs. I think albums are getting back in fashion with a lot of the younger kids today.